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July 31, 2014
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Thailand: Junta prepares heavy security force to smother protests

Thai policemen stand guard prior to a demonstration by anti-coup protesters at a shopping mall in Bangkok.

Thailand's junta has prepared a force of over 6,000 troops and police for deployment in Bangkok to smother protests and prevent opposition to the May 22 coup from gaining momentum.

The military has cracked down hard on pro-democracy dissidents and supporters since it ousted Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra last month, seeking to mute criticism and nip protests in the bud.

A heavy security force presence at potential flashpoints in Thailand's largest cities since the coup has limited protesters to small gatherings, which are often coordinated through social media and mostly located around shopping malls.

Authorities were focusing on five possible protest sites in Bangkok, said deputy police chief Somyot Poompanmoung.

They included the country's main international airport and the downtown area around the Grand Palace, as well as sites where protests have previously taken place, he said. The palace is one of Bangkok's top tourist attractions.

"We hope the protests would not ignite any violence and would end peacefully," Somyot said.

Army chief and coup leader General Prayuth Chan-ocha had instructed security forces to avoid confrontation, Somyot said. Police would photograph protesters, identify them and issue arrest warrants later, he said.

The force on Sunday numbered 27 army companies and 15 police companies, Somyot said. A similar number of troops and soldiers were deployed a week ago.

Thailand's May military coup was the latest convulsion in a decade-long conflict between the Bangkok-based royalist establishment and the rural-based supporters of Yingluck and her brother, former prime minister Thaksin Shinawatra.

Thaksin, who was ousted in a 2006 coup and has lived in self-exile since a 2008 corruption conviction, won the loyalty of the rural poor with populist policies and was the real power behind the deposed government of his sister.

Yingluck was prime minister until May 7, when a court found her guilty of abuse of power and she stepped down.

The army toppled the remnants of her government on May 22, saying it needed to restore order after six months of sometimes violent anti-government protests that had brought the economy to the brink of recession.

Thailand has been without a properly functioning government since December, when Yingluck dissolved parliament and called a February election in a bid to end anti-government protests. But protesters disrupted the vote, the election was annulled, and Yingluck's crippled caretaker government was forced to limp on.

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Tags:  Thailand  junta  protests  World  





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