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July 24, 2014
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Pro-Russians hold independence votes in Eastern Ukraine

A womans steps out of a polling booth prior to vote for the referendum called by pro-Russian rebels in eastern Ukraine to split from the rest of the ex-Soviet republic.

Pro-Moscow rebels expressed confidence that eastern Ukraine had chosen self-rule in a referendum today, with some saying that meant independence and others eventual union with Russia as fighting flared in a conflict increasingly out of control.

Well before polls closed, one separatist leader said the region would form its own state bodies and military after the referendum, formalising a split that began with the armed takeover of state buildings in a dozen eastern towns last month.

Another said the vote would not change the region's status but simply show that the East wanted to decide its own fate, whether in Ukraine, on its own or as part of Russia.

A near festive atmosphere at makeshift polling stations in some areas belied the potentially grave implications of the event. In others, clashes broke out between separatists and troops, over ballot papers and control of a television tower.

Zhenya Denyesh, a 20-year-old student voting early at a university building in the rebel stronghold of Slaviansk, said: "We all want to live in our own country". But asked what he thought would follow, he replied: "It will still be war."

In the southeastern port of Mariupol, scene of fierce fighting last week, there were only eight polling centres for a population of half a million. Queues grew to hundreds of metres in bright sunshine, with spirits high as one centre overflowed and ballot boxes were brought onto the street.

On the eastern outskirts, a little over an hour after polls opened, soldiers from Kiev seized what they said were falsified ballot papers, marked with Yes votes, and detained two men.

They refused to hand the men over to policemen who came to take them away, saying they did not trust them. Instead they waited for state security officers to interview and arrest them.

On the edge of Slaviansk, fighting broke out around a television tower shortly before people began making their way through barricades of felled trees, tyres and machinery for a vote the West says is being orchestrated by Moscow. The Ukrainian Defence Ministry said one serviceman was wounded.

A man was later reported killed in a clash in the eastern town of Krasnoarmeisk, Interfax-Ukraine news agency said, adding to a toll so far in the dozens but creeping higher by the day.

Western leaders, faced with Russian assertiveness not seen since the Cold War, have threatened more sanctions in the key areas of energy, financial services and engineering if Moscow continues what they regard as efforts to destabilise Ukraine.

The European Union declared the vote illegal on Sunday and may announce some modest measures as soon as Monday, limited by the bloc's reluctance to upset trade ties with Russia.

Moscow denies any role in the fighting or any ambitions to absorb the mainly Russian-speaking east, an industrial hub, into the Russian Federation following its annexation of the Black Sea peninsula of Crimea after a referendum in March.

But, in a sign it may have set its sights beyond Crimea, Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin said he had brought to Moscow a petition by residents of Moldova's Russian-speaking breakaway region of Transdnestria backing union with Russia.

Ukraine's Interior Ministry called the eastern referendum a criminal farce, its ballot papers "soaked in blood". One official said two thirds of the territory had not participated.

Ballot papers in the referendum in the regions of Luhansk and Donetsk, which has declared itself a "People's Republic", were printed without security provision, voter registration was patchy and there was confusion over what the vote was for.

In Slaviansk, self-proclaimed mayor Vyacheslav Ponomaryov said turnout was 80 percent and the result was not in doubt.

Asked if he knew what would come next, the former businessman, who wore a Ralph Lauren polo shirt with a pistol in an underarm holster, said: "Of course we know. Work starts on the establishment ... of the Donetsk People's Republic."

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Tags:  Russia  Ukraine  pro-Russian  referendum  separatism  





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